ANURAAG SHARMA: “PAPA AND OTHER POEMS” + TRANSLATION INTO HINDI OF ANDREW PARKIN, “STAR OF A HUNDRED YEARS”

I draw your attention to a new publication from Indian poet Anuraag Sharma, as well as to his new translation of the Anglo-Canadian poet Andrew Parkin.

 

Anuraag’s latest volume, PAPA AND OTHER POEMS, has been published (2008) by A.R.A.W.LII. Publications, Ajmer, India (www.arawlii.com). It is accompanied by two forewords and one five afterwords. The fifth afterword (pp. 66-68) is by myself and can be found at:

http://yatrarollason.info/files/Anuraagintro.pdf

 

The same publisher has issued (2009) Anuraag’s translation into Hindi (in a parallel text Hindi/English edition) of Andrew Parkin’s STAR OF A HUNDRED YEARS: A SCENARIODE FOR SIR RUN RUN SHAW.  This dramatic poem is a tribute to the Singapore film director and major exponent of Chinese-language cinema. Andrew Parkin, long resident in Hong Kong and the author of five other volumes of poetry, now lives in Paris.

 

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Here is an extract from my afterword to PAPA AND OTHER POEMS:

 

‘The voice of Anuraag Sharma that eloquently resounds in this volume is but one of the author’s multiple voices as dramatist, translator, critic and, in the avatar which here concerns us, poet. In this his latest collection of poems, the reader encounters images that crystallise or expand around human relations, ties of kinship and friendship, as exemplified in the father-son relationship that gives the book its title. Private epiphanies flash into consciousness to illuminate and transcend a public world that has failed to deliver on its promises and has burnt itself out: still, through the word, the poet strives to make sense of disparate lives, others’ and his own.

 

The locus of many of the poems is recognisably subcontinental, but the reader should not expect to find a hyperspecific instance of ‘Indian poetry’: Anuraag Sharma resembles a Satish Verma rather than a Jayanta Mahapatra, with Indian motifs appearing in order to ground the poems in a determinate time and place rather than to adumbrate a full-scale critique of Indian realities (…)’

 

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